.Net, C#, Design, Material Design, UI, UX, WPF, xaml

Version 1.0 of Material Design In XAML has arrived!

Well, this project kinda came out of nowhere, but has proven to be pretty popular and I’ve really enjoyed getting it to this state: version 1.0!   It’s officially a non-alpha, non-beta, totally live thing!!

I’ve cranked up my contributions over the last month to push it over the line for its for first official release, recently adding runtime palette switching via the PaletteHelper/Swatch API, a new ColorZone control to help you design your layouts, and more granular control of ripples and shadows.  A few styles and animations have also been tweaked to really improve the look and feel.

To go with version one I’ve completely re-worked the demo app, as illustrated in the video.  It’s really worth checking, it might just give you some inspiration for your WPF apps!

And if you haven’t seen I recently launched a new home page for the project: materialdesigninxaml.net, which includes a Get Started section.

There’s still plenty more to come for both Material Design In XAML and Dragablz but I will be treating myself to a little break for a week or two!

Design, Material Design, UI, UX

Open Sourcing a Logo

Open source doesn’t have to just apply to code.  I’ve been applying my XAML skills to Material Design In XAML Toolkit to help other developers quickly craft good looking user interfaces in WPF.  I’m pretty happy with the results, and in some of my own projects I’ve produced some striking applications using the toolkit.  Despite doing this, I readily admit I’m no designer.  For such a visually focused code library I really wanted a logo, but knew I could never do the task justice.

So I threw the task out to the community.

I created an issue on GitHub, tweeted a bit, posted on Reddit.  And waited.  Pretty much bang on 2 weeks later a result came back from a young guy called Sam, and I’m really happy with it:

Material Design In XAML Toolkit

Sam or “snalty” can be found on Twitter, and you can see some of his other designs on his blog.

In summary, a great bit of collaboration helping to push Material Design In XAML Toolkit further along.